Malnutrition Awareness Week™ Schedule

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CE Webinars

September 16
12:00–1:30 PM  
September 17
12:00–1:00 PM
 
September 18
12:00–1:30 PM
 
September 19
12:00–1:00 PM
 
September 20
12:00–1:00 PM
 
Starvation, Acute and Chronic Malnutrition: Adaptation or Resolution Across the Life Cycle
Details
Under-recognized Malnutrition in the Post-Bariatric Surgery Population
Details
Malnutrition in the Trauma and Emergency Surgery Settings: An Under-Recognized Issue
Details
Improving Health Equity through Quality: The Global Malnutrition Composite Score
Details
Nutrition Support Access: Breaking Down Barriers
Details
CE Credits: 1.5 hours CE Credits: 1.0 hours CE Credits: 1.5 hours CE Credits: 1.0 hours CE Credits: 1.0 hours
Pediatric Content Included Pediatric Content Included
All times listed are Eastern Time. ASPEN is accredited to provide medical, pharmacy, nursing, and dietetic credits. Webinar schedule and topics subject to change.

Other Malnutrition Awareness Week Events

September 16–20    Malnutrition Week ANZ 2024  
October 7–11    Canadian Malnutrition Awareness Week 2024  

Monday, September 16, 2024, 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM ET
Starvation, Acute and Chronic Malnutrition: Adaptation or Resolution Across the Life Cycle

Register Here

Pediatric-Icon-MAW24  Pediatric Content Included 

Extensive literature exists on how to diagnose and treat protein-calorie malnutrition in adults and children. However, there is very little on what comes after a diagnosis is made and interventions are implemented.

This webinar includes discussions on pediatric and adult patients and will address the following key questions:

  • What is the resolution of malnutrition? What parameters should be used to assess if resolution is achieved?
  • What is the metabolic adaptation/accommodation that occurs with chronic, disease-driven malnutrition?
  • How can this information be communicated to other clinicians, coders, and auditors?

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe the parameters that confirm the resolution of protein-calorie malnutrition (PCM), including metabolic changes and adaptations underlying the types and severity of PCM in adult and pediatric patients.
  2. Differentiate clinical signs/symptoms indicating prolonged impairment due to malnutrition versus metabolic accommodation/adaptation.
  3. Identify appropriate interventions and care planning concepts for patients in recovery from starvation/semi-starvation, chronic, and acute PCM.

Faculty and Topics

Malnutrition: Adaption or Resolution in Adults
Elizabeth Zorzanello Emery
Elizabeth Zorzanello Emery, EdD, RD, CNSC, LDN, Practice Associate Professor, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing and Clinical Educator, Clinical Nutrition Support Services, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Malnutrition: Adaption or Resolution in Pediatrics
Mark Corkins
Mark Corkins, MD, CNSC, FASPEN, AGAF, FAAP, Division Chief and Professor, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN
Resolving Malnutrition: Interventions and Documentation
Maureen Janowski
Maureen Janowski, RDN, CSG, LD, FAND, Corporate Director, Malnutrition, Morrison Healthcare, Palatine, IL
Moderator
Elizabeth Schuerman
Elizabeth Schuerman, RD, CNSC, NWCC, Clinical Dietitian, Clinical Nutrition, Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center, Spokane, WA

Level: Intermediate
UAN: JA0002345-0000-24-128-L99-P 
CE Credit: 1.5 hours

Registration Fee Early
by September 13
Regular
September 14 and after
ASPEN Members, MAW Ambassadors Free Free
Non-Members $19 $29

 Tuesday, September 17, 2024, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM ET
 Under-recognized Malnutrition in the Post-Bariatric Surgery Population

Register Here

Many providers need to improve their awareness of the occurrence and gravity of macronutrient and micronutrient malnutrition in the post-bariatric surgery population. Diagnosing malnutrition in post-bariatric surgical patients is complicated by the intentional nature of weight loss. Additionally, micronutrient metabolism is altered, and the risk of deficiency is high. This webinar will address these challenges to enable clinicians to better address malnutrition in post-bariatric surgery patients.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify which weight loss surgery procedures are restrictive, malabsorptive, or both.
  2. Evaluate patients for common signs of micronutrient deficiencies seen after weight loss surgery.
  3. Recognize and evaluate patients for common signs of macronutrient deficiencies seen after weight loss surgery.

Faculty and Topics

Under-recognized Malnutrition in the Post-Bariatric Surgery Population
Neil Floch
Neil Floch, MD, FACS, Director of Bariatric Surgery Greenwich Hospital, Associate Professor of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, Section of Bariatric & Minimally Invasive Surgery, Greenwich, CT
Under-recognized Malnutrition in the Post-Bariatric Surgery Population
Angela Wolfenberger
Angela Wolfenberger, MS, RDN, LD/N, Bariatric Dietitian, Queens Comprehensive Weight Management Program, Kamuela, HI
Moderator
Amy Ralph
Amy Ralph, MS, RD, CSO, CDN, CNSC, Clinical Manager Digestive Health Nutrition, Yale New Haven Hospital, Milford, CT

Level: Intermediate
UAN: JA0002345-0000-24-129-L01-P
CE Credit: 1.0 hours

Registration Fee Early
by September 14 
Regular
September 15 and after
ASPEN Members, MAW Ambassadors Free Free
Non-Members $19 $29

 Wednesday, September 18, 2024, 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM ET
 Malnutrition in The Trauma and Emergency Surgery Settings: An Under-Recognized Issue

Register Here

Pediatric-Icon-MAW24  Pediatric Content Included 

This webinar will allow clinicians to gain specific knowledge and strategies for recognizing malnutrition in trauma and emergency surgery patients of all ages. These patient populations, especially pediatric trauma and surgery patients, are underrepresented in large research studies. This webinar is a unique opportunity to develop knowledge and understanding from the experts.

Learning Objectives

  1. Detail the unique considerations for malnutrition assessment and malnutrition risk in trauma and emergency surgery populations. 
  2. Describe the diagnosis of malnutrition in pediatric trauma and emergency surgery populations. 
  3. Apply considerations in both adult and pediatric populations- through age-specific case studies. 

Faculty and Topics

Malnutrition in Trauma and Surgical Critical Care
April Mendoza
April Mendoza, MD, MPH, Associate Professor of Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of California San Francisco-East Bay, Trauma Medical Director, Wilma Chan Highland Hospital, Alameda Health System, Oakland, CA
Nutrition Case Studies in Adult Trauma and Surgical Critical Care
Stacy Pelekhaty
Stacy Pelekhaty, MS, RDN, LDN, CNSC, Senior Clinical Nutrition Specialist, Clinical Nutrition, University of Maryland Medical Center, R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, Baltimore, MD
Malnutrition in Pediatric Trauma and Surgical Critical Care
Irene Isabel (“Iris”) Lim-Beutel
Irene Isabel (“Iris”) Lim-Beutel, MD, MPH, Associate Director of the Comprehensive Colorectal Center, Children’s Mercy, Kansas City, MO
Moderator
Ajanta Raman
Ajanta Raman, MSN, AGACNP, CNSC, Metabolic Support Services Nurse Practitioner, Truman Medical Center, Kansas City, KS

Level: Intermediate
UAN: JA0002345-0000-24-130-L99-P
CE Credit: 1.5 hours

Registration Fee Early
by September 15 
Regular
September 16 and after
ASPEN Members, MAW Ambassadors Free Free
Non-Members $19 $29

 Thursday, September 19, 2024, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM ET
 Improving Health Equity through Quality: The Global Malnutrition Composite Score

Register Here

Malnutrition burdens healthcare systems and jeopardizes patient outcomes, yet it often goes unnoticed. The environment, policies, and community can influence malnutrition, making social determinants of health (SDOH) a key factor when evaluating it. The Global Malnutrition Composite Score (GMCS), the first nutrition-focused electronic clinical quality measure, places increased value on the importance of malnutrition care for acute care patients and has been identified as a key measure to improve rural health, SDOH, and food insecurity. This webinar will explore the GMCS and how it can help hospitals improve health equity and quality care.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe the GMCS and its application for quality improvement.   
  2. Assess the value of the GMCS selection as an eCQM and discuss barriers and opportunities to implementation.       
  3. Explain the impact Health Equity has in nutrition and dietetics practice and how the GMCS can support the hospital in addressing health equity.

Faculty and Topics

Quality Improvement in Addressing Malnutrition Care
Matthew Bechtold
Matthew Bechtold, MD, FASGE, FACG, AGAF, FASPEN, Section Chief of Gastroenterology, Harry S. Truman VA, Professor of Medicine, University of Missouri- Columbia, Columbia, MO
Implementing The Global Malnutrition Composite Score to Improve Health Equity
Kimberly Ambrose, MS, RDN, LDN, Memorial Health System, System Director, Food & Nutrition Services, RCNM, Marietta, OH
Moderator
Maureen Janowski
Maureen Janowski, RDN, CSG, LD, FAND, Corporate Director, Malnutrition-Morrison Healthcare, Palatine, IL

Level: Intermediate
UAN: JA0002345-0000-24-131-L99-P
CE Credit: 1.0 hours 

Registration Fee Early
by September 16 
Regular
September 17 and after
ASPEN Members, MAW Ambassadors Free Free
Non-Members $19 $29

 Friday, September 20, 2024, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM ET
 Nutrition Support Access: Breaking Down Barriers

Register Here

Individuals in the home health care setting with chronic conditions impacting their ability to adequately consume or receive nutrients are often at risk of becoming malnourished. The ability of these individuals to be assessed and diagnosed is surprisingly inconsistent. This webinar will highlight challenges in diagnosing malnutrition in the outpatient population. Speakers will address the barriers preventing patients from receiving a malnutrition diagnosis and being started on appropriate nutrition support therapy when needed.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify challenges in recognizing and diagnosing malnutrition in patients in the home health care settings.
  2. Outline common barriers preventing patients in the home care setting from adequate nutrition support. 
  3. Explore strategies to overcome barriers to access nutrition support.

Faculty and Topics

Parenteral Nutrition Access Issues: Impact on Nutrition Outcomes
Jay M. Mirtallo
Jay M. Mirtallo, RPh, Professor Emeritus, the Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Recognizing and Diagnosing Malnutrition: A Consumer’s Perspective
Maisy Cyr
Maisy Cyr, MSW, Manager of Education, Home Parenteral Nutrition Consumer, Hallowell, ME
Overcoming Barriers to Adequate Nutrition Support for Malnourished Consumers
Linda Lord
Linda Lord, NP, Nurse Practitioner/Adult Nutrition Support Clinic/University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY
Moderator
Juliana Tamayo
Juliana Tamayo, MS, RD, CNSC, Clinical Dietitian, Medstar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC

Level: Intermediate
UAN: JA0002345-0000-24-132-L99-P
CE Credit: 1.0 hours 

Registration Fee Early
by September 17 
Regular
September 18 and after
ASPEN Members, MAW Ambassadors Free Free
Non-Members $19 $29