Webinar Descriptions

Refeeding Syndrome: New Consensus Recommendations
 Register Now

Date: June 24, 2020                   
Time: 3:30 - 5:00 PM ET

This webinar informs clinicians about the new consensus recommendations for the screening and management of patients who are at risk of refeeding syndrome. Recommendations include updates to risk guidelines for adults; new risk guidelines for pediatric patients; and a more official diagnosis of refeeding syndrome. The new recommendations are the result of a 3-year project by the ASPEN Safety and Clinical Practice committees. 

Learning Objectives

  1. Summarize the key points in the ASPEN Refeeding Consensus Recommendations paper.
  2. Describe refeeding syndrome in an adult patient.
  3. Describe refeeding syndrome in a pediatric patient.

Faculty and Topics
Refeeding Syndrome: The Need to Revisit an Old Foe
Captain Joshua S.V. da Silva, DO, MC, USAF, Emergency Medicine Resident, Write State University Boonshoft School of Medicine, Dayton, OH

The Larger Side of Refeeding Syndrome: Recommendations for Adult Patients
Phil Ayers, PharmD, BCNSP, MSHP, FASHP, Chief, Clinical Pharmacy Services,                       

Small Packages But Potentially Big Problems: Recommendations for Refeeding Syndrome in Pediatric Patients
Mary Petrea Cober, PharmD, BCNSP, BCPPS, FASPEN, Clinical Coordinator – NICU/Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice; Department of Pharmacy, Akron Children’s Hospital/Northeast Ohio Medical University, Akron, OH

Moderator
Mary Petrea Cober, PharmD, BCNSP, BCPPS, FASPEN, Clinical Coordinator – NICU/Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice; Department of Pharmacy, Akron Children’s Hospital/Northeast Ohio Medical University, Akron, OH

CE Credit: 1.5 hours
UAN: JA0002345-0000-20-088-L04-P
Level: Intermediate


Acute Versus Chronic Critical Illness: A Nutrition Focus
 
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Date: August 3, 2020
Time: 12:00 – 1:30 PM ET

Join us for this program which will address the major differences in the pathophysiological changes and inflammatory responses between acute and chronic critical illness (the ebb phase and the flow phase) as well as, transition into Persistent Inflammation, Immunosuppression, Catabolic Syndrome (PICS) and potential nutritional interventions. Within this paradigm we will address gold standard, evidence-based guidelines, as well as, novel research with certain nutritional supplements that may provide benefit for PICS nutrition. Learners will also hear the use of different predictive equations compared to the gold standard indirect calorimetry in assessing energy expenditure in trauma and surgical ICU patients during the initial phase of critical illness, and as the illness and overall condition stabilize while remaining in the critical care unit. 

Learning Objectives

  1. List major physical and biochemical signs that characterize acute and chronic critical illnes
  2. Explain the change in energy expenditure during initial and recovery/stable phase of critical illness
  3. Describe nutritional aspects of critical illness, guidelines recommendations, and potential interventions
  4. Outline nutritional interventions for chronic critical illness and PICS
  5. Compare the predictive equations used to estimate energy need with indirect calorimetry during critical illness and identify the pros and cons of these methods
  6. Determine early versus late measured energy requirements in the trauma and surgical ICU patients
Faculty and Topics
Martin Rosenthal, MD, Assistant Professor, Division Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville; Chair UF Nutrition Committee, University of Florida Health, Gainesville, FL

Amir Kamel, PharmD, BCNSP, Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Nutrition Support / Critical Care ; Department of Pharmacy; Clinical Assistant Professor |University of Florida Health Shands, Gainesville, FL

Moderator
Manpreet Mundi, MD, Department, Associate Professor of Medicine, Endocrinologist, Internist, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, Diabetes, and Nutrition, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

CE Credit: 1.5 hours
UAN: JA0002345-0000-20-089-L01-P
Level: Intermediate


Long Term Home Parenteral Nutrition (HPN) Management Series
Part 1: Patient Appropriateness for HPN, Developing a HPN Order, and Patient and Caregiver Education
Register for Part 1   Register for the 2-Part Series

Date: October 28, 2020
Time: 1:00 – 2:30 PM ET

This essential two-part series will discuss the long term monitoring of patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) from discharge to home. The first will cover discharge basics, assessing if a patient is appropriate for home parenteral nutrition and what education to provide to patient and caregivers. The second will focus on long term monitoring, including vitamin/mineral monitoring, biochemical monitoring, formula adjustments etc., preventing hospitalizations and tapering off therapy.

Learning Objectives

  1. Evaluate those patients appropriate for home parenteral nutrition and be able to list three important factors to consider.
  2. Assess the parenteral nutrition inpatient order and appropriate adjustments to make for the home setting.
  3. Describe three important teaching points to cover to ensure safe administration of TPN in the home setting. 

Faculty
Nancy Sceery, RD, LD, CNSC, Nutrition Support Clinician, Providence Veteran’s Administration Medical Center, Providence, RI

Allison Hopkins, Pharm.D., BCNSP, CNSC, Pharmacist, Clinical Trainer, Coram CVS Specialty Infusion, Tuczon, AZ

Moderator
Katie Kelly MS, RD, CSO, CNSC, Clinical Dietitian III, Nutrition Department, Stanford Health Care, Stanford, CA

CE Credit: 1.5 hours
UAN: JA0002345-0000-20-090-L04-P
Level: Intermediate


Long Term Home Parenteral Nutrition (HPN) Management Series
Part 2: Micronutrient Needs Assessment, HPN Adjustment, Complication Prevention, and HPN Weaning

Register for Part 2   Register for the 2-Part Series

Date: November 4, 2020
Time: 1:00 – 2:30 PM ET

This essential two-part series will discuss the long term monitoring of patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) from discharge to home. The first will cover discharge basics, assessing if a patient is appropriate for home parenteral nutrition and what education to provide to patient and caregivers. The second will focus on long term monitoring, including vitamin/mineral monitoring, biochemical monitoring, formula adjustments etc., preventing hospitalizations and tapering off therapy.

Learning Objectives

  1. Evaluate micronutrient needs and patient assessment and appropriate recommendations to TPN.
  2. Determine potential complications that may arise with PN management and when to make adjustments.
  3. Design a safe PN weaning plan when appropriate and resources to provide to patients.

Faculty
Allison Hopkins, Pharm.D., BCNSP, CNSC, Pharmacist, Clinical Trainer, Coram CVS Specialty Infusion, Tuczon, AZ

Nancy Sceery, RD, LD, CNSC, Nutrition Support Clinician, Providence Veteran’s Administration Medical Center, Providence, RI

Moderator
Jane Hughes PharmD, BCNSP, BC-ADM, Clinical Pharmacist/Research Coordinator, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA

CE Credit: 1.5
UAN: JA0002345-0000-20-091-L04-P
Level: Intermediate